Blog

Airbnb House Rules: Should You Create “Seasonal” House Rules?

Should You Create Airbnb "Seasonal" House Rules? from MaidThis.com

Setting Airbnb house rules is something all hosts must do when first setting up their listings. But once the rules have been set, how often are they revisited? Unless you encounter a situation that specifically required a change-up or addition, our guess is not very often. 

While most house rules are applicable year-round, there are a few things that may be more season-specific that went forgotten. Below, we’ve detailed two small-but-powerful season-related situations that could make all the difference in your turnovers.

 

Outdoor Sport Rules

Depending on where you’re located, you may want to implement seasonal rules that pertain to outdoor activities. 

For example, if you’re in California and close to a beach, you may request during the spring and summer months that guests make an effort to remove their shoes after visiting the beach and before entering the house so as not to track sand into the house. (This is a good rule in general but especially important during the high-beach season.)

Alternatively, if your Airbnb is in an area that appeals to winter sports enthusiasts like skiers or snowboarders, you may ask your guests who have been out in the snow to remove their wet outerwear in a specific area of the house to avoid tracking any dirty water inside.

Some things you might consider to be “common sense” may be less evident to out-of-towners when it comes to keeping things clean. It’s not a bad idea to blatantly mention the removal of shoes or clothes in the entryway in your house rules.

 

Temperature Consistency

To avoid astronomically high utility bills during the hottest or coldest parts of the year, you may choose to implement a rule (or rather, a request) that guests don’t change the thermostat temperatures too drastically during the hottest parts of the summer or coldest parts of the winter.  This may seem off-putting to some, but most guests will be understanding (assuming your temperature settings are reasonable).

One way to keep tabs on this – or better yet, control it – is to install a smart thermostat system like the Honeywell T9 Smart Thermostat. With a wifi-enabled thermostat system, you can set up alerts on your phone to notify you when threshold temperatures have been exceeded. Depending on the model you choose, you may even be able to “lock” the thermostat settings so guests can’t go past certain temperatures.

If you choose to enact this rule, whether you install a smart system or hope for the best from your guests, be sure to specifically state where you’d like the temperature to sit in your listing rules. This is especially true if you go with a smart system as guests may be perturbed to discover they can’t do much to change the temperature after they’ve already checked in.

 

Overall, setting Airbnb house rules isn’t all that difficult. Like most things, though, it’s never a bad idea to revisit what you have and consider making changes or additions. By implementing a few extra rules during the height of the summer and winter seasons, you may save yourself some headaches in the long run.

 

Clean my
Vacation Rental


single-blog-sidebar-vacation-rental
  • Automated Scheduling
  • Cleaning Report with Pictures
  • Never a No-Show. Guaranteed.
Book Now

Testimonials

At first I tried to take care of all of the cleaning process myself, and it turned out to be a bigger headache than anything else. So a friend told me about MaidThis and its been fantastic. I’ve been working with my cleaners for a few months so far. I recommend you check out the service for yourself.
Brent
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

I definitely think that as a company we've been able to make more money, not only because we're saving money by using Maid This, but also because they're helping take a few of the necessary evils with doing vacation rentals off of the property managers plate.
Laura G
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

Blog

5 Habits of Highly Successful Hosts

successful airbnb hosts habits

 

In the world of vacation rentals, if you’re not savvy, your listings might fall by the wayside. Successful Airbnb hosts don’t achieve their status by accident: There’s a strategy behind everything they do. 

Fortunately, anyone can improve their success rate by looking to these hosts for inspiration. If you want to level up your hosting game, here are 5 habits of highly successful hosts that you should channel. 

1. Be prepared.

Everyone in the vacation rental industry needs to come prepared with all the information they need to make smart decisions. Part of this requires research: Read up on your local ordinances to ensure that your listing is in accordance with the law. Hosts who are careless on this front can end up slapped with expensive fines or even banned from their platform of choice.

This preparedness should carry over to dealing with guests, as well. While you want to hope for the best, there are enough horror stories out there to prove hosts should take precautions before renting out their space. Assume that anything in the house could be broken and invest in the right insurance before you even start renting your property. You’ll be glad you did. 

2. Think like an entrepreneur.

Even if you use a website such as Airbnb to facilitate your vacation rentals, renting out your property is essentially running a small business. It’s important to periodically set goals for yourself the way you would with any business: What do you want to get out of hosting? What concrete steps can you take to get there?

Next, think about the resources you’ll need to provide the best possible rental experience and plan accordingly. You may need to budget for a professional cleaning service or for a co-host to help you out. Stay on top of your finances the way you would if you were running a company, even if you’re only a casual host. When it comes to tax season, there’s no room for error. 

3. Anticipate your guests’ needs.

Good hospitality is about more than just providing toiletries for your guests. The most successful hosts go above and beyond to understand their customers and anticipate their every need. Everything from the photos you include in your listing to the amenities you offer on-site will have an impact on a potential future guest. 

Evaluate your listing and your rental property from a guest’s perspective. From their initial search all the way to checkout, think about ways you can make their experience better. Even small gestures like a welcome kit can go a long way towards positively impacting their stay. 

4. Stay current. 

If you’re not regularly refreshing and updating your vacation rental listings, you could be missing out on valuable business. Successful Airbnb hosts look at their listings with a critical eye and know when to make a change. If your photos are outdated or you’ve made changes to your home that aren’t reflected in your listing, now is the time to fix it. 

5. Communicate. 

Clear communication should be at the heart of every interaction with a potential guest. So many negative guest experiences can be avoided through communication. When in doubt, over-inform. You want your guests to have all the information they need to feel comfortable during their stay, and any questions or issues should be addressed as quickly as possible. 

 

While there will always be some hosts who are more successful than others, you can increase your own success if you continuously try to improve. By working on these 5 habits, you can be sure to take your hosting to the next level no matter where you’re starting out.

 

At MaidThis, we take your Airbnb business seriously. Your guests’ comfort during their stay is equally important to us as it is to you. That’s why we leave no cushion unturned in our turnover cleanings. Learn more about how we can help you.

 

Clean my
Vacation Rental


single-blog-sidebar-vacation-rental
  • Automated Scheduling
  • Cleaning Report with Pictures
  • Never a No-Show. Guaranteed.
Book Now

Testimonials

At first I tried to take care of all of the cleaning process myself, and it turned out to be a bigger headache than anything else. So a friend told me about MaidThis and its been fantastic. I’ve been working with my cleaners for a few months so far. I recommend you check out the service for yourself.
Brent
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

I definitely think that as a company we've been able to make more money, not only because we're saving money by using Maid This, but also because they're helping take a few of the necessary evils with doing vacation rentals off of the property managers plate.
Laura G
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

Blog

Handy vs Tidy Vs MaidThis: Which Company Is Right for Your Airbnb Cleaning?

handy vs tidy airbnb cleaning

 

There are lots of cleaning companies – and cleaners, for that matter – out there that you can call on to clean your Airbnb after your guests have checked out. But what sets one cleaner apart from the rest? Between Handy, Tidy, and MaidThis, where will you get the most bang for your buck? ✓ 

We wondered ourselves. So, we did a little homework. Take a look at our competitors below and see how MaidThis measures up.

 

Cleaning by Handy 

Handy has great customer reviews and operates in a number of different U.S. cities as well as locations in Canada and the U.K.

The folks behind Handy created a business of nearly all home-based trades: They offer home cleaning, specialized installations, handyman services, outdoor projects, and more recently, home renovations.

 

How We Compare

So how, exactly, does Handy compare to MaidThis? From what we can see, Handy:

• Offers everyday home cleaning, move-out cleaning, and special deep cleaning.

Keeps everything streamlined through their online booking portal.

Promises reliable and experienced cleaners they’ve vetted themselves and on whom they’ve run extensive background checks.

Provides flexibility and convenience in scheduling.

 

How We Differ

Here’s the biggest difference we see between ourselves and Handy: Handy does not specialize in Airbnb turnover cleaning.

As a host, it pays to have cleaning professionals who know the ins and outs of cleaning a vacation rental: It’s not like simply cleaning a home that is consistently lived in by the same people. 

Guests expect their Airbnb to be somewhat like a hotel, so turnover cleanings must turn over every stone and ensure that everything is pristine, like each set of guests are the first ever to stay.

While we’re sure Handy’s teams do a fantastic job, at MaidThis, every single one of the cleaners we match with you has vacation rental cleaning experience. We’ve been in this game for a long time and know what’s expected so there are no hiccups or learning curves.

 

Handy Tidy MaidThis
Partner with Other Vacation Rental Industry Service Providers
Report Low Supplies and Damages
Cleaners Send Turnover Completion Notifications
Automatic Calendar Sync – the App Schedules Cleanings for You
Airbnb-Specialized Cleaning
Flexible and Convenient Scheduling
Cleaners are Vetted and Background-Checked
Cleaning Fee Structured by Home Size
Cleaning Fee Structured by Hours Worked
App-Based Booking
Online Booking
Offers Specialized Cleaning Services
Available in Most US Cities Coming Soon!

 

Cleaning by Tidy

Tidy operates in major cities in over 20 U.S. states and like Handy and MaidThis, vets its cleaners and runs background checks on everyone they hire. Unlike Handy, however, Tidy sticks to strictly offering cleaning services to its clients. 

We’ll be honest: At first glance, it may seem like service between Tidy and MaidThis is a wash (pun intended).

 

How We Compare

How do Tidy and MaidThis compare? Tidy:

• Offers specialized Airbnb cleaning.

• Makes booking easy through their online booking portal and specialized app.

• Promises reliable cleaners who have specific experience with Airbnb turnover cleanings.

• Provides flexibility and convenience in scheduling.

 

How We Differ

Perhaps most interestingly, one of the biggest differences between Tidy and MaidThis is how we structure our turnover packages: Tidy structures their turnovers by the hour rather than by the size of your vacation rental.

This may seem trivial, but we argue that it matters. Here’s why:

No two stays are alike and some guests will be tidier (no pun intended here) than others. There are certain tasks that need to be done regardless of how messy your guests are or aren’t, but if you’re paying by the hour rather than by the size of your place, you run the risk of over-paying for what should have been a different kind of appointment. Alternatively, you may find that your place is messier than expected and if you haven’t booked a long enough appointment, your place may not be in tip-top shape for your next guests.

Here are a few other differences we spotted in our research:

At MaidThis, we provide our hosts with a software integration booking tool so they don’t have to lift a finger. Our booking system syncs with your calendar and books your turnover cleanings automatically. Tidy does not appear to offer any such system; hosts have to schedule individual cleanings themselves.

• Matched cleaners cross all their “t”s and dot their “i”s: Cleaners can send turnover completion notifications via the app with photos and timestamps so you know things have been done just the way you expect them to be. Tidy’s turnover cleaners may not report in real-time.

• When supplies are running low or something is damaged, the app will prompt your turnover cleaner to report it right away. Tidy does not explicitly offer this service to its hosts.

MaidThis knows the vacation rental industry and we work closely with a number of other partners in the sphere.

 

Guests expect their Airbnb to be somewhat like a hotel, so turnover cleanings must turn over every stone and ensure that everything is pristine, like each set of guests are the first ever to stay.

At MaidThis, we know that firsthand. After years of working in the Airbnb industry, we’ve learned how to keep your guests happy and ensure you get a 5-star review after every single stay, and we match you with cleaners who fit this bill.

Ready to take the leap? Book your first turnover cleaning with us now!

 

Clean my
Vacation Rental


single-blog-sidebar-vacation-rental
  • Automated Scheduling
  • Cleaning Report with Pictures
  • Never a No-Show. Guaranteed.
Book Now

Testimonials

At first I tried to take care of all of the cleaning process myself, and it turned out to be a bigger headache than anything else. So a friend told me about MaidThis and its been fantastic. I’ve been working with my cleaners for a few months so far. I recommend you check out the service for yourself.
Brent
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

I definitely think that as a company we've been able to make more money, not only because we're saving money by using Maid This, but also because they're helping take a few of the necessary evils with doing vacation rentals off of the property managers plate.
Laura G
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

Blog

Bounce Back After Working with an Unreliable Vendor

what to do unreliable vendor la airbnb

When it comes to your rental property, you want only the best. Sometimes that means hiring professionals to clean your property, manage your landscaping, or perform repairs. It’s frustrating when you spend the time, money, and energy to hire a company to service your vacation home only to have them perform subpar work or stand you up.

A vacation rental host should be able to rely on a vendor to do the job they were hired for, so it’s not surprising if you feel blindsided when something goes wrong. Fortunately, one bad vendor experience doesn’t have to ruin your day. If you’ve encountered an unreliable service company, here are 3 things you can do to recover.

1. Reach out to the company.

If you’re unsatisfied with a vendor’s services, the first step is to reach out to the company. Explain what went wrong and express your disappointment. If you’ve already paid for their services, ask for a refund or a partial refund for the inconvenience. If the company isn’t willing to refund you for the poor service they provided, ask for a discount or, if the services were not performed, refuse to pay.

Pay attention to how they handle your complaints. If they are mortified and apologetic, there’s a good chance the poor service you received was a fluke. If they are snippy or dismissive, it could hint at deeper issues with the company itself. Their reaction will tell you a lot about the integrity of the vendor.

2. Leave a review.

This step is optional, but depending on your interactions with the vendor, you might want to consider leaving a review detailing your experience. Consider this: As a host, you appreciate reviews, right? Even “negative” reviews can help you improve things for your future guests’ experience.

Here’s how to leave a helpful review – both for the company (if they’re open to making changes based on their customers’ experience) and for others considering the company’s service: If your complaint was resolved in a timely and satisfactory manner, you should point that out after detailing your problems with the service. However, if the company did not try to help you, that’s important to note, too.

Many people might feel guilty about leaving a negative review. While you shouldn’t do it lightly, other potential customers deserve to know if a company will deliver subpar service and then refuse to make it right. A negative review isn’t revenge, it’s doing your part to warn other hosts about a potentially predatory vendor.

3. Do your research for next time.

Now that you’ve had one bad experience, you don’t want to have another one. Before choosing a new vendor, take the time to do extensive research into the company you’re hiring. Look at their reviews and note especially how the company responds to negative reviews. While mistakes happen, a good company will do everything they can to make it right.

Many companies will allow you to contact past clients as references before you make a decision. If you’re planning on investing in their business, you should take this extra step if it’s available. Otherwise, a thorough investigation of their web presence should do the trick.

 

At the end of the day, you should be able to trust your vendors to deliver on their promises. If you’re consistently let down by the service companies you hire, it’s time to take a new approach.

 

At MaidThis! we pride ourselves on the quality and reliability of our work. For a cleaning service you can rely on time and time again, check out what MaidThis! can do for you.

 

Clean my
Vacation Rental


single-blog-sidebar-vacation-rental
  • Automated Scheduling
  • Cleaning Report with Pictures
  • Never a No-Show. Guaranteed.
Book Now

Testimonials

At first I tried to take care of all of the cleaning process myself, and it turned out to be a bigger headache than anything else. So a friend told me about MaidThis and its been fantastic. I’ve been working with my cleaners for a few months so far. I recommend you check out the service for yourself.
Brent
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

I definitely think that as a company we've been able to make more money, not only because we're saving money by using Maid This, but also because they're helping take a few of the necessary evils with doing vacation rentals off of the property managers plate.
Laura G
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

Blog

Increase Your Occupancy Rate this Valentine’s Day

increase airbnb occupancy valentines day

Valentine’s Day is right around the corner. If you’ve still got availability in the month of February and are looking to increase your occupancy rate, there’s no better time to exploit a holiday to get a few more bookings.

We’ve got a few tricks up our sleeve to recommend but whatever you do, don’t delay! The holiday will come and go before you know it. The longer you make your stand-out deal available, the better.

Here are 3 foolproof tips for using Valentine’s Day for your booking advantage.

1. Update your listing to include some V-Day bonuses all month long.

Before you go changing things in your listing, we recommend that you copy and paste your current, “everyday” listing information somewhere where you can access it and bring it back later, like a Google doc. That way, when your special is over, you can easily revert your listing back to the way it was.

Start by changing your listing header to include something about Valentine’s Day. If you’re throwing in a little something extra, like a bottle of wine or romantic add-ons, mention it in your headline.

Be sure to describe these things more specifically in your listing, too, so you can bait and hook guests who click on your listing.

We recommend running these specials all month long and here’s why: Valentine’s falls on a Thursday this year and, as always, couples don’t always celebrate on the actual day or weekend. February is a month-long love fest, so don’t take away your special offer too soon.

2. Advertise your place on Facebook and Instagram.

You don’t have to have a vacation rental website to advertise on Facebook. While you do need a Facebook page or, in the case of Instagram, an Instagram account, to advertise on each platform, both are quick and easy to set up and don’t need to be flashy to get your point across.

When it comes to advertising on these two social media giants, Facebook and Instagram are now one entity so you can prepare for two things at one time if you’re vying to advertise on both platforms. The best part is that marketing your Airbnb listing through Facebook is incredibly affordable and you don’t need to be a social media or marketing whiz.

That said, if you’re not familiar with Facebook ads, diving in can be overwhelming. There are so many choices and options for where to place your ad and how to set it up – but don’t let it scare you! Dive into some solid how-to articles (get started on your new Facebook page by following steps from this Buffer article and get tips for ads from this article by Hootsuite) and dip your toes into the social marketing game.

3. Get in touch with your “best” previous guests.

We always recommend ringing up your previous guests and offering them another great stay. If they were happy before, chances are they’d love to visit you again.

Here are a few things to keep in mind when running through your guest Rolodex:

  • If your guests live far away, they’re less likely to take you up on your offer. However, if your guests live close, they’re better candidates to whom you can reach out.
  • If you have guests that have stayed with you multiple times already, add them to the top of your list.
  • Offer all your guests a special bonus for referring new friends of theirs to your place in the month of February. Don’t forget to follow through with whatever you promise.

 

Don’t let a great opportunity pass you by this month. February is a great time to try out a few new things for a short period and track the benefits.

 

Clean my
Vacation Rental


single-blog-sidebar-vacation-rental
  • Automated Scheduling
  • Cleaning Report with Pictures
  • Never a No-Show. Guaranteed.
Book Now

Testimonials

At first I tried to take care of all of the cleaning process myself, and it turned out to be a bigger headache than anything else. So a friend told me about MaidThis and its been fantastic. I’ve been working with my cleaners for a few months so far. I recommend you check out the service for yourself.
Brent
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

I definitely think that as a company we've been able to make more money, not only because we're saving money by using Maid This, but also because they're helping take a few of the necessary evils with doing vacation rentals off of the property managers plate.
Laura G
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

Blog

Growing from Afar: How One Host Manages Multiple Listings from Out of Town

remote airbnb management LA

 

Recently, we at MaidThis had a fantastic opportunity to chat with and interview Elizabeth K., a Dallas-based vacation rental host. Elizabeth has built her business from just one vacation rental listing in the Dallas-Fort Worth area to 7: She’s recently expanded into remote Airbnb management with one listing in LA and the other 6 in DFW.

Check out our interview with Elizabeth and learn more about:

1) the systems she’s been implementing to help her grow and keep her business organized.

2) which services and apps she uses to help manage her listing.

3) how Elizabeth manages guest reviews.

 

 

Getting to Know Elizabeth K.

MT: Well, to start us off, can you tell us a little bit about yourself and your business, and how you got started?

EK: Yeah, sure. So the first time I got into Airbnb, I was living in Denver in a very cool neighborhood – LoHi – for those who are familiar with Denver… and I moved in with my boyfriend but my lease wasn’t up yet and I was kind of stuck in the lease. So I thought, well, perfect, I’ll just throw it on Airbnb.

I was doing very well with that, actually, and eventually found myself in a similar situation later in Dallas – the boyfriend and I got a place together, an apartment with a least still on it – and what I was paying in rent I was doubling that amount, so I was covering my rent and making that much more…

So, that was my first one [here] and then the lease was up a couple of months later, so I got another one nearby where I live. I was worried about the risk and got one that was very inexpensive. From there, I got another one in the same building and in the past seven months, I have 7 Airbnb rentals.

MT: Wow! And are they all in the Dallas area, then?

EK: This is how I was introduced to MaidThis! I got one in Los Angeles – in Marina del Rey. It’s an awesome location and I was so excited about it. Everyone I know was telling me it was a horrible idea, but I felt confident I could pull it off.

One week was spent getting it fixed up and decorated, and the second week was going to be focused on finding the right cleaning company. And fortunately, I came across [MaidThis] and that was the biggest hurdle. I mean, I can decorate any place in no time, but obviously, in this business, a partnership with the right cleaning company is very pivotal, especially if you’re trying to scale your business.

Expanding & Scaling the Business

MT: Wow, that’s incredible. You’re managing multiple places locally as well as dabbling in remote Airbnb management. So you’ve done all of this since February 2018, is that right?

EK: I have, yeah, And I don’t know that I would recommend that to most people. [Laughs] I think my fiance wants to shoot me half the time!

I love getting them fixed up, you know, and creating homes for people and whatnot. And slowly, as I’ve been scaling, I’ve had to create operating systems or put systems in place that help. I can’t possibly reach out to all the people and handle everything.

So now I’m working with Guesty and a few other great Airbnb apps that automate a lot of things, which really, it’s a lifesaver. I really don’t have to worry about the one in Los Angeles because you guys go and clean, we don’t have to talk about it, or I don’t have to worry about what I owe you. I love it.

MT: So tell us how kind of how you’ve managed … Because you don’t actually own any of your locations. They’re all literally rentals that you’re renting in your name and then renting out as well on Airbnb. Have you had any issue with that as far as not being the actual owner or has it been smooth sailing for you?

EK: Some days, everything goes great and other days it’s like, oh my gosh. I’ve got a lot of hoops to jump through and it’s kind of a gray area so I certainly don’t go announcing it… Like this past weekend, it was kind of crazy. I was in LA at the Marina del Rey location, and one thing after the next is going wrong, and one of my new units – somebody walked down to the leasing office and asked for a parking pass saying they were Airbnb-ing my place. So that wasn’t very exciting. So sometimes, yeah, of course, I have to deal with things like that.

MT: Wow, that sounds like a lot to try and juggle! On the other handing, using Guesty specifically to help you manage all of your bookings across multiple sites has been working well?

EK: Yes. And let me tell you, it’s a learning curve. I was the last person on a Blackberry and trying to get me to switch to an iPhone, it literally was very challenging. It’s learning a whole new operating system.

But it’s proven to be very, very useful. I can’t tell you. The key on scaling any kind of business like this is automation. So now whenever guests check in, they automatically get an email and they think it’s coming from me because it’s very personalized.

But yeah, everything kind of runs itself. Now, I don’t even know who’s checking in, checking out. Whereas before, I was constantly reaching out and there’s just no way you can do … I have so many reservations every month it would be chaotic!

MT: Do you also work with any kind of outside management company that helps you keep track of your guests and correspondence and things like that? Are you able to manage it on your own?

EK: No, I don’t. It’s just me and Guesty and you guys now, MaidThis, fortunately. And then I’ve got my housekeeper whom I very much consider my business partner here [in Dallas]. She’s wonderful and is the first person I call about everything. She’s the only one that gets it, you know? We can laugh about things together and cry whenever people leave it especially dirty and whatnot.

It’s been … very rewarding, I guess is the right word? Is just being able to provide work for her. Not that she doesn’t already have enough clients, but now she’s been able to let go some of them, and she has her own schedule. I don’t have to keep tabs on her. She gets updates as the cleanings come in, and does her work, and I can trust that. Then she’s hired a couple of people below her, so it just makes me feel good that I’m providing employment for people.

MT: What you’ve accomplished this year is really incredible! So just to confirm, you have six rentals currently in Dallas or in the Dallas area? Dallas, Fort Worth, and then just one in LA?

EK: Right. One right now in LA. The whole thing, it’s kind of just been an experiment. From what I read from other companies that have done this and done a good job of it, I think it’s kind of crazy that I’ve gotten seven in the past six months.

But now, we are actually, we just put our own house that we live in on there. I thought I had it blocked off for another week, but I noticed Friday morning when I woke up I was like, “Oh no, honey, we’re not gonna have to go stay at number one.” I have them all numbered because yeah, we just got like an eight or nine night booking here!

It’s exciting. It’s crazy. We’re kind of like living this hobo lifestyle of having to bounce back and forth.

MT: So tell us a little bit about how you decided to expand outside of your own – for lack of a better term – niche there in Dallas into a completely different state. How did you make that decision? How did you get started? That’s very unlike what most other MaidThis Airbnb hosts are doing currently. It’s a really interesting story.

EK: It makes me sound like a crazy person, but I noticed this girl and she had hundreds of reviews and I thought, how on Earth? So I clicked and I saw that she had 64 listings and I was like, what on Earth? There’s no way. This cool chick from Canada, she looks, like, younger than I am. I’m like, how does she manage that? That’s when I first started really diving into the idea of expanding and I saw that she had places in Dallas.

And then the more I started diving in and finding other people with multiple listings, it seems like there’s a handful of them that they like to center themselves in cool cities and the urban areas of cool cities. I know Dallas very well because I was born and raised here, and lived in LA for that 12 years, so I know LA well. I know Denver well. So I was thinking, you know, I might as well … Plus, I feel landlocked here in Dallas. So I thought it’s a great excuse that I have a place to go stay for free out there. [Laughs]

If I can pay the rent and put some money in my pocket, and it’s making a lot of money in my pocket, so yeah. I just decided to take the leap and I’m pretty excited about it.

My plans moving forward, but I’m going to slow down because it’s not practical to continue at this rate. I want to get everything really dialed in, but I would like to get maybe four more in that area in LA and then yeah, maybe like Denver or Hawaii.

Dream big! The more I’ve grown, lately, I’m targeting nicer places and trying to furnish them very nice and really make it fancy because for me, at least, I found that the nicer properties tend to be a little more profitable. They’re more risky, but yeah.

Getting It All Done

MT: Are you purchasing all of the furniture yourself to furnish these places and the décor? Or are you renting that stuff?

EK: I am purchasing.

It’s like a constant running joke if ever stuff were to hit the fan. I have got like a warehouse-full worth of stuff. I’m gonna have so many washer dryers, PBs, air mattresses galore, sheets. Yeah, there’s a lot of stuff!

LA, that was very challenging. Here, I’m like a handywoman. I’ve got a garage full of tools and I’ll buy furniture. In the beginning, I was buying nice, used furniture and then I would fix it up and make everything look pretty, but the more I’ve grown, the more that’s not practical. So I started buying stuff. LA, I really spent a lot of money. That was challenging trying to just get everything and be out there without my car and my tools and my crap.

MT: So, when, officially did you start listing that rental on Airbnb or the other online listing platforms? And because you’re so far removed from LA currently, how often do you go or plan to go to see it?

EK: I think I posted it in September.

And you know what else I do? A little cheating tip I do is I normally post them on Airbnb or whatever. I go ahead and create the listing even like two weeks before I have the keys. So I might snap some pictures whenever I’m doing a walkthrough and things like that. Yeah, I put that one on in I think late September and it was booked the entire month, maybe.

There was one weekend it wasn’t booked, and so I flew out there. That was last weekend, but it’s been booked solid since. I had one girl that booked it for over two weeks, and she really wanted to stay the entire month, but the rest of it was booked up so she couldn’t. But that one’s been great.

There have been a few things, like, when I just went back out there, I had a storage thing for the garage. It actually arrived late and my first guest was already there… I’m in Dallas. and there’s a huge box out on the patio. So that was a little stressful.

When I was just there, we got it set up. My fiance helped me and it took a long time, but there’s a back stock so we have extra supplies and stuff like that in LA. Here, I can run them around or whatever, but obviously, I couldn’t do that there.

Over the weekend though, I have this guy coming tomorrow, and he requested bottled waters to be there. But I have a girlfriend that lives around the corner, so she went and stocked the fridge for him.

MT: That’s nice. So it definitely helps to have somebody or some entity that can help for things like that. If you didn’t have that kind of contact or friend in the area, so let’s say you do decide in the future to expand to Hawaii or to do a rental in Denver, how would you handle a situation like that if you don’t have somebody that you can call and say, “Hey, can you do me a favor?”

EK: I don’t know yet, but we will find out within the next six months, I guess! I know a lot of people in LA, but Hawaii, for example, I’d have to go out there and get the furniture, and da, da, da. During that time, I would definitely find somebody that’s local that I trust or you know. There are those apps like Handy and I don’t know what else there is, and I’ve thought about that. But I don’t know; I prefer having a person.

Systems for the Win

MT: So you mentioned that you are listed on multiple vacation rental sites. Do you find that there’s another one that you tend to get booked on often or not so much?

EK: Well, thus far, the only other one that I’m on is booking.com. However, I have an onboarding lineup with Rentals United through Guesty and then through them, and get like VRBO … Home Away and all that stuff. That’s gonna be, I guess let’s call it “Phase Three.” “Phase One” was Airbnb, “Phase Two” was Booking.com. And Booking.com, each new channel, that’s a serious learning curve too and getting everything set up right.

It’s been really complex. I think the more you spread out to various sites, the more hurdles you have to cross. But once you get it dialed in, I hope, I don’t know, it’s all an experiment, that everything should kind of run itself.

MT: So you mentioned that part of your expansion and growth has involved a lot of systems, and we’re firm believers in systems at MaidThis What kind of systems have you set up for yourself that you feel like have been successful? Or have you had a system that you thought was going to work really well that failed?

EK: I think a lot of that came into play wherever I went over to Guesty. Even before that, just from researching and whatnot, learning that in order to scale the business, you have to have systems and automation, automation, automation. So with Guesty, the automation has been incredibly important. So I don’t have to reply to people, check-in instructions, check out instructions, the WiFi stuff.

It’s crazy how many messages you can get in one day about WiFi and how confusing it can be trying to find the right passwords and network names and whatever when you’ve got multiple things going on. So just having all that stuff automated is the number one thing. And the cleaning, to have that automated. And now I’m actually converting my housekeeper here in Dallas over to this system that I use with MaidThis

And now actually, I mean I wouldn’t really follow my example if I were anybody else, but I’m just now really getting on top of reports and accounting. I’m very lucky that I’ve been making money and staying afloat and everything that just intuitively, I’m like, okay, I’ll go get one in Marina del Rey because that sounds fun. And it’s all worked out so far, but now I’m just trying to really get down to like the accounting part of it. And how much am I really making per unit? Obviously, I’m covering all my expenses, but I want to be making as much as I can per unit.

So seeing in reports and deducting all the expenses. You know where it gets more complex, too. As I’ve been growing is just in the beginning, I was the cleaner, and I was making a lot more money. But obviously, I can’t clean all the units and scale the business, but now it’s like the more you grow, everybody kind of takes a piece of the pie.

Choosing Airbnb Rates

MT: Did you raise your rates at all or by a small percentage to help you cover those kinds of costs or have you maintained the same rate since you started, for the most part?

EK: Great question, and yes. Hopefully, I believe I got it set up correctly. On Guesty, I’m able to adjust the rates per booking channel. So for example, Airbnb takes three percent, and I didn’t include that because I’m just accustomed going to Airbnb rates, but booking.com charges 15 percent for any bookings that come through that.

MT: Have you been changing anything with the seasons? Obviously, LA is probably not a good example just because it is so new to you, but as far as Dallas is concerned, did you raise your rates for summer? Are you starting to lower them now that fall is coming?

EK: That’s another system that I have. I don’t know what you want to call it, but another app that I’ve integrated is BeyondPricing.

Get a FREE MONTH + a $30 credit with BeyondPricing!

 

In the beginning, and I would advise nobody to follow Airbnb’s suggested rates because they’re way off and usually way under. For me, knowing the areas and how nice my places are or whatever, I can kind of guess what the good rate wouldn’t be and Airbnb’s is way low. But BeyondPricing, now that I’ve integrated it, changes and handles all the pricing for all of my units. It has algorithms that like hotels use for rates and seasonality, or if there’s a concert in Dallas that would make it more popular, or weekends or whatever.

So I kind of follow what other people have done that are successful companies and hope for the best. So far, it seems to be okay. Based on the advice on their website, I also removed my weekly and monthly discounts, and it seems to be working out well. And another system, by the way, is I’ve also changed things to require a 2-night minimum stay.

MT: That’s been a wise decision, you think?

EK: Yeah, you know, I did that actually because with MaidThis, I need to be able to give 48 hours advanced notice to 100% confirm a cleaning. And I thought, you know, with that 2-night minimum, I’d always be able to give that advanced notice. Plus, with my housekeeper in Dallas and the people who are now working for her – if you do it all in one night and everyone checks out on Sunday, that’s a lot of cleaning going on… It’s just so tough to do that.

I think you just get more quality bookings when you have minimum amounts.

MT: As far as feedback goes, do you have a system or foolproof system for getting positive feedback for yourself? Do you tend to leave negative reviews for “bad” guests?

EK: I know everyone is concerned with negative reviews, but it all kind of balances out. I have automatic reviews implemented through Guesty so I don’t have to worry about it. Because that’s a big pain to go through for each person. And every once in a while, when a guest is a nightmare – leaving the place super dirty or just was a major thorn in my side or threatening me with bad reviews to try and get a free stay, which is all once in a blue moon – I try to do that before the automation posts its review. But for the most part, I get good reviews.

If something happens, I often find myself giving some kind of monetary compensation just to make sure that people don’t get mad or give me a bad review. When you’re renting, there’s so much that’s out of your hands and in the hands of the maintenance department. So, you have to be prepared for that.

 

Thank you, again, Elizabeth, for sharing more about your business! We wish you the best as you continue growing and scaling your business.

 

 

Clean my
Vacation Rental


single-blog-sidebar-vacation-rental
  • Automated Scheduling
  • Cleaning Report with Pictures
  • Never a No-Show. Guaranteed.
Book Now

Testimonials

At first I tried to take care of all of the cleaning process myself, and it turned out to be a bigger headache than anything else. So a friend told me about MaidThis and its been fantastic. I’ve been working with my cleaners for a few months so far. I recommend you check out the service for yourself.
Brent
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

I definitely think that as a company we've been able to make more money, not only because we're saving money by using Maid This, but also because they're helping take a few of the necessary evils with doing vacation rentals off of the property managers plate.
Laura G
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

Blog

How to Become an Airbnb Co-Host or Vacation Rental Property Manager

become airbnb cohost vacation rental manager

With vacation rental property management companies on the rise (and let’s also acknowledge the fact that these entities are nothing new when it comes down to it), marketing yourself as a vacation rental manager and landing a management gig is tough. The competition is fiercer than ever.

So if you want to jump into the property management pool, how do you get started? We won’t deny that it will be a bit of an uphill battle, but we’ve got a few tips to help you seal a deal (or a few!).

Finding Opportunities

Perhaps one of the most head-scratching roadblocks when it comes to getting started in vacation rental management is knowing where to track down hosts and owners who are looking for management (or as Airbnb refers to it, “co-hosting”) help. You can’t just go knocking on doors, can you?

Not exactly. But you can use some of the tools already at your disposal.

1. Tap your contacts.

If you’re already an entrepreneur of sorts like our friend Davida Horn, who started her management gigs via her relationship as a bookkeeper for her clients, use that “in.” If you’re already offering a service and happen to know or work with vacation rental hosts, talk to them about the possibility of helping them manage their property.

2. Become a really good local guest.

This is just smart all the way around: Being a great guest means you probably also know what a great host is like. But use your local vacation rental stays to your advantage – use this as a way to meet and get to know other local hosts in your area.

Sure, you have to pay to stay, but you’re also building relationships. If the host you’re staying with isn’t interested in getting management or co-hosting help, perhaps they know someone that is.

Put simply: It pays to know people and the more people you know, the more you could potentially get paid.

3. Search the interwebs.

There’s a possibility that you could find someone asking about where to find a vacation rental manager on a number of job boards and, more importantly, this may also be a good place for you to list your own availability.

You can also look on industry-specific websites like Airhosta. Airhosta matches potential co-hosts and property managers with hosts looking for help with their listing. Check it out!

Land the Gig: Stand Out from the Crowd

Now that you know where to search, who to talk to, and what to look for, the next step is ensuring that once you start exploring those avenues, you look the part and have a stellar sales pitch.

Don’t forget you’re selling your skills as a co-host or vacation rental manager! Your professionalism and preparedness matter.

1. Organize a management proposal to show off your expertise.

Ideally, you should have some experience as a host yourself so you can prove once and for all that you know your “stuff” and can handle helping your potential clients’ guests and running the show from the backend.

Show your potential client your plans for:

  • Incoming guest inquiries and general communication
  • Check-in and check-out procedures
  • Turnover cleaning
  • Emergencies
  • Maintenance and general upkeep

 

We’re just scratching the surface here – overprepare so you can show yourself at your best.

2. Focus on what sets you apart.

As we said before, vacation rental management is nothing new and it seems like everyone is getting into the business these days.

What do you have that makes you different – or arguably better – than the other individuals and companies you’re competing against? Don’t be afraid to be confident about what you can offer. That’s likely to be your biggest selling point.

3. Set a reasonable (but competitive) rate for your services.

Typically, vacation rental managers and co-hosts take a percentage cut of the rental rate secured by the actual host. A number of sources online suggest anywhere from 10-25%.

Setting your own rate can be a little tricky because you don’t want to undersell yourself, but you certainly don’t want to oversell, either. Look at your experience and what unique points you can offer, and set a rate for yourself.

Consider developing a tiered option, too, to give your host more flexibility. If guests stay longer, perhaps your percentage cut could be a bit lower.

In the end, you have to do what’s best for you and feel confident that you’re getting back what your services are worth.

 

It’s no cakewalk getting started as a vacation rental manager or co-host, but the payoff is often well worth the legwork. If entrepreneurship is something you’re striving for and you’re passionate about hosting guests and visitors to your city, this may be a great “job” for you. So what are you waiting for? Get started!

 

Need help deciding how to show your potential hosting clients how you’ll handle turnover cleanings? Let MaidThis! help! We provide Airbnb and vacation turnover cleanings to dozens of hosts and have an exclusive team of cleaners whose sole responsibility is turning over vacation rentals. Give us a shout for more information.

 

Clean my
Vacation Rental


single-blog-sidebar-vacation-rental
  • Automated Scheduling
  • Cleaning Report with Pictures
  • Never a No-Show. Guaranteed.
Book Now

Testimonials

At first I tried to take care of all of the cleaning process myself, and it turned out to be a bigger headache than anything else. So a friend told me about MaidThis and its been fantastic. I’ve been working with my cleaners for a few months so far. I recommend you check out the service for yourself.
Brent
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

I definitely think that as a company we've been able to make more money, not only because we're saving money by using Maid This, but also because they're helping take a few of the necessary evils with doing vacation rentals off of the property managers plate.
Laura G
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

Blog

How Much You Should Charge for the Security Deposit (And Other Fees)

airbnb deposit fees for hosts

As a vacation rental host (especially if you’re just getting started), you might ask yourself, “What should I charge for all these random Airbnb hosting fees and deposit?!”

Deciding what to charge can be a little stressful for some hosts; finding that “sweet spot” of “not too high, not too low” may seem like a challenge for even the most seasoned hosts.

Don’t fret, though! We’ve got some suggestions for how to decide on whether or not charging the optional fees is right for you and how much you should require if you do.

The Differences Between Fees

There are a few different fees that Airbnb and other vacation rental platforms always charge, like the flat 3% service charge, as well as a few that are up to you as the host.

Here’s a breakdown:

Security Deposits

Contrary to how it may sound, a security deposit isn’t paid by your guests before they check in. Instead, this is an amount you can charge to help cover damage or cleanup (if your place is left excessively messy) costs. As a host, though the deposit is outlined for guests when they book, you can only invoke and request a security deposit after a troublesome guest has checked out.

Deposits aren’t required by most vacation rental sites; this is entirely left up to you. Deposit amounts are calculated based on a percentage – from 10-50% of the rental agreement. If you’re not worried about the cost of replacing damaged things in your home, you can easily forego the deposit and not worry your guests. However, it would also be acceptable to request a low deposit just to be safe.

On the other hand, if you have nice things in your place such as expensive furnishings, irreplaceable items, or art, you should consider requiring a heftier deposit, somewhere around the 50% mark. As guests aren’t required to pay this amount up front, it shouldn’t be a deterrent to your occupancy goals.

Airbnb Cleaning Fee

Cleaning fees are a one-time fee that guests pay upon completing their reservation. These are set by you (the host), are optional, and are much easier to figure out.

What’s the best way to determine what you should charge for a cleaning fee? For starters, ensure that you’re charging enough to cover your turnover cleaning costs. If you’re not sure what that amount might be, factor in these things:

  • How many bedrooms does your place have? How many bathrooms?
  • How long will your guests be staying? Do you plan to offer any additional, “light” maid service to them during a longer stay?
  • How many loads of laundry will you need to do to ensure all the linens are ready for your next guests?
  • Will other areas of your vacation rental need to be cleaned?
  • How much time, overall, would it take you to clean the entire place yourself?
  • Can you bake in amenities reimbursement into this (toilet paper, shampoo, etc)?

 

Skip the headache and let MaidThis! handle your turnover cleanings. We’ll let you know what the cost will be, and you can incorporate that into your fee.

It’s also wise to charge a tad extra here just in case you’re ever in a pinch and need to do some extra cleaning after a particularly messy guest. Hold on to that extra little revenue until you need it; those little fees will add up quickly and can help you better manage your seasonal cleaning, too.

 

There’s no reason to fuss over setting fees. Guests understand that there will be some additional monetary requests made of them to stay anywhere, even a hotel; vacation rental sites are simply more open about showing them where their entire payment goes.

So when it comes time to set or adjust your fees, do so without worry! Use the guidelines above and we’re sure you’ll find a solution that best fits your vacation rental and your guests.

 

Clean my
Vacation Rental


single-blog-sidebar-vacation-rental
  • Automated Scheduling
  • Cleaning Report with Pictures
  • Never a No-Show. Guaranteed.
Book Now

Testimonials

At first I tried to take care of all of the cleaning process myself, and it turned out to be a bigger headache than anything else. So a friend told me about MaidThis and its been fantastic. I’ve been working with my cleaners for a few months so far. I recommend you check out the service for yourself.
Brent
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

I definitely think that as a company we've been able to make more money, not only because we're saving money by using Maid This, but also because they're helping take a few of the necessary evils with doing vacation rentals off of the property managers plate.
Laura G
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

Blog

How Often Do You Need to Replace Linens in an Airbnb?

replace linens airbnb vacation rental

Being a vacation rental host requires a lot of attention to detail. To ensure you get great reviews from your guests, it’s up to you to ensure your place is looking just like it does in your listing photos.

Part of maintaining a stellar vacation rental is discerning when it’s time to replace linens and other things in your Airbnb. From sheets and towels to the carpeting, everything has to be considered.

Here’s a quick breakdown of the things you should be prepared to replace and when you should be doing it.

Linens

Your linens really go through the ringer if you stop and think about it. Depending on how busy your vacation rental gets, they get used A LOT and then get washed after every guest has checked out. That’s likely more wear-and-tear than what you put your own linens through at home. Before you know it, your vacation rental sheets and towels can start to look a little ratty….especially if/when your guests use the towels to clean up spills or makeup – ahhhh!

All that being said, it’s wise to replace your sheets and bath towels with some regularity. Here are some recommend timeframes:

 

  • Sheets: If you’ve got a high occupancy rate year-round, aim to replace your sheets every 6-12 months at least. If you’re not booked as frequently, once a year should do it. Obviously, if you find any kind of ripping or tears or if stains pop up on your sheets, toss them out immediately and replace them.
  • Pillows: Pillows can be washed but even the best washing machine can’t rid them entirely of loose dead skin cells and germs that accumulate over time. The best option is to replace the bed pillows at least every 6 months.
  • Bath Towels: It doesn’t take long for bath towels to start looking worn out. Again, depending on how consistently you’re booked throughout the year, aim to change these out every 3-6 months. This is especially important if you provide white or light-colored towels as they’ll show signs of wear faster than darker towels.
  • Hand Towels: Stock up on hand towels. These take a real beating and should be replaced at least when you replace your bath towels. It’s smart to buy extra hand towels when you buy your bath towels so you’ve got a few on hand if you should ever need them.
  • Kitchen Towels: If you choose to provide kitchen or tea towels to your guests in addition to paper towels, plan to replace these every 6-12 months. Unlike your other linens, kitchen towels may not get used as much; it all depends on how regularly your guests cook. Check these often and look out for signs of wear or stains. These are the least expensive and, arguably, the easiest linens to replace, so don’t dilly-dally!

 

 

When replacing linens, don’t be tempted to take the cheap route. Consider this an investment in your business and purchase at least mid-range sheets and towels for your guests. If you enjoy the hunt, check out discount stores like TJ Maxx, Marshalls, or Stein Mart. If you’d prefer to skip what can sometimes turn into a wild goose chase, the Threshold or Fieldcrest brands from Target or this option from Amazon* also a good bet.

You certainly don’t need to purchase top-of-the-line linens, but be sure to consider quality over price when you shop… After all, the goal is to limit headaches AND get you that 5-star review!

Appliances and Home Mechanical Necessities

Chances are, your major appliances and home mechanical systems (like your HVAC) don’t get much use if you’re renting out your entire home. The washing machine, dishwasher, and kitchen appliances likely don’t see much use until your guests check out and your thermostat runs consistently without much thought. Thankfully, that probably means they’re in fairly good shape and you won’t need to replace anything anytime soon.

If you rent a room and live in your home full-time, you’re operating things often enough that you have a leg up in this department: You can spot things before anyone else does. If this doesn’t apply to you, however, you must remain vigilant!

Unlike linens that should be carefully monitored and replaced at the first signs of overuse, appliances are harder to plan ahead for. We simply expect these machines to function properly until the day… well, the day they don’t.

It would be silly for us to suggest you to sit in front of your dishwasher or washing machine and watch for glitches or sit idly and wait for the thermostat to act strangely. However, keep a watchful eye on these things anytime you do a walk-through of your vacation rental.

It’s smart to ask your guests to report anything that seems “off” if they operate any of your appliances but it’s even better if you can catch wind of trouble before your guests see it.

If you don’t visit your vacation rental often, ask your cleaning team or management company to let you know if they notice anything operating oddly when they conduct turnover cleanings or walk-throughs. They are your best reporters.

Carpets

Carpet is a lasting floor covering and doesn’t need replacing often. That’s probably a relief, considering how expensive it can be to make a flooring change.

The frustrating thing about carpet is that it doesn’t wear evenly. Heavier traffic areas like the living room, hallways, and bedroom doorways show their age more rapidly; the aging pace increases if shoes are worn inside the house or if you have or allow your guests to bring pets.

Generally speaking, carpet should last anywhere from 7-10 years after it’s been installed. With proper care, you could get as many as 15 years out of it.

To avoid the need to replace carpet before its average shelf life, here are a few tips for keeping it looking as new as possible:

 

  • Invest in doormats. Doormats at the front entrance and any other doors leading outside with greatly decrease the amount of dirt and dust carried into your vacation rental from your guests’ shoes. This is your best first line of defense.
  • Vacuum often. Some sources will suggest you vacuum every day while others will recommend once or twice a week. Daily vacuuming in a vacation rental is likely next to impossible – you certainly shouldn’t ask your guests to do it! However, be sure to run the vacuum after every checkout. If your guests are staying long-term, offer them basic maid services weekly or bi-weekly to ensure your carpet is getting the care it needs.
  • Shampoo or steam your carpets. With so many people coming and going, you’ll want to shampoo your carpets or hire a professional to clean them more often than the average homeowner. Don’t wait for things to start looking dingy or because you need to work on a stubborn stain. Aim to deep steam clean your carpet every 6-12 months. Resist the urge to overdo things, though. Too much of a good thing can be damaging. Hint: just ask MaidThis to arrange this for you during a turnover cleaning…..we have a partner company who can totally help with steam cleaning. 🙂

 

To know when it’s time to recarpet your place, look out for visible signs of wear through main walkways. When a deep cleaning doesn’t do much to revitalize it, it may be time to go shopping.

 

Ensuring your guests are happy should start before they even arrive for check-in. By keeping a watchful eye on your place and replacing or revitalizing things before they show they need it, you’re setting yourself up for great reviews and referrals.

 

*This is not an affiliate link.

 

Clean my
Vacation Rental


single-blog-sidebar-vacation-rental
  • Automated Scheduling
  • Cleaning Report with Pictures
  • Never a No-Show. Guaranteed.
Book Now

Testimonials

At first I tried to take care of all of the cleaning process myself, and it turned out to be a bigger headache than anything else. So a friend told me about MaidThis and its been fantastic. I’ve been working with my cleaners for a few months so far. I recommend you check out the service for yourself.
Brent
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

I definitely think that as a company we've been able to make more money, not only because we're saving money by using Maid This, but also because they're helping take a few of the necessary evils with doing vacation rentals off of the property managers plate.
Laura G
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

Blog

5 Areas to Clean in Your Vacation Rental This Spring

spring cleaning vacation rental

Spring is on its way and the busy season is right on its heels. Before you know it, there will be fewer opportunities to plan and schedule a deep spring cleaning.

We’re sure you make a point to carefully clean every visible corner of your home when guests check out but we also suspect there are a few places that don’t get the same kind of consistent attention.

Is your place ready for the season ramp-up? Here are 5 areas to clean in your vacation rental this spring before things get busy.

1. Inside kitchen and bathroom drawers.

Your bathroom drawers may be fairly easy to open and spot dust, especially because they’re most likely to be empty. Kitchen drawers, however, are more likely to have gadgets and cooking tools taking up space and hiding crumbs.

Make a habit of removing all the items from the drawer once a year and using a damp cloth to trap and remove debris from the bottom and corners of drawers.

Don’t stop with the kitchen and bathroom – check all the drawers throughout your rental.

2. Under large area rugs.

Your cleaning team makes a habit of vacuuming your large area rugs to remove dust but do they get under the rug to catch dust that’s collected below?

If your rug hasn’t been moved in a while, roll it up and give the bare floor a good run over with a vacuum or damp mop if your rug is covering a tiled or wood floor. It’s not a bad idea to do this quarterly to avoid a significant buildup of allergens and dirt.

3. Behind large appliances.

When was the last time your oven, refrigerator, and washer and dryer were pulled away from the wall? If you’re like most homeowners and vacation rental hosts, we’re going to guess it’s been a while.

It’s common for bugs to take up residence and expire behind these fixtures. Though you may not have a “problem” with pests and though your guests don’t see them, they’re still not houseguests you want hanging around.

Ask your cleaning team to make a point to pull out your appliances and clean behind them. A quick sweep with a vacuum hose or duster should do the trick.

4. Inside the dryer vent.

If you offer your guests the ability to do their laundry, be sure to stay on top of this additional set of machines.

Even the most carefully maintained dryers can suffer from lint buildup, especially in the vent. This can not only cause your dryer to have issues but it can be a fire hazard.

If you’re not willing to clean out your own dryer vent and hose on your own, hire a professional HVAC company to do it. Alternatively, dryer hoses are relatively inexpensive; you can simply replace the entire hose altogether.

5. Closet shelving.

When was the last time you wiped down the shelves in your linen closets or pantry? These areas may not get much attention due to their usually being bare, but that doesn’t stop them from collecting dust.

Ask your cleaning team to quickly run a dusting wipe over them to trap loose dust that has settled over the course of the year. While you’re at it, check your kitchen cabinet shelves, too. Leave no spot undusted!

 

Don’t wait to get these things marked off your cleaning list. Though they’re important, take solace in knowing that you won’t need to revisit these anytime soon.

 

Feeling overwhelmed by adding these items to your cleaning list? Let MaidThis! handle your turnover cleanings for you! We’ll get you set up and ready for your next check-in in no time.

 

Clean my
Vacation Rental


single-blog-sidebar-vacation-rental
  • Automated Scheduling
  • Cleaning Report with Pictures
  • Never a No-Show. Guaranteed.
Book Now

Testimonials

At first I tried to take care of all of the cleaning process myself, and it turned out to be a bigger headache than anything else. So a friend told me about MaidThis and its been fantastic. I’ve been working with my cleaners for a few months so far. I recommend you check out the service for yourself.
Brent
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved

I definitely think that as a company we've been able to make more money, not only because we're saving money by using Maid This, but also because they're helping take a few of the necessary evils with doing vacation rentals off of the property managers plate.
Laura G
Airbnb Host in LA
90+

Hours
Saved